Big Fork Outdoor Store

 Historic Crete & The Minoans: Outdoor Fountains

Historic Crete & The Minoans: Outdoor Fountains

During archaeological excavations on the island of Crete, many varieties of conduits have been detected. They were used for water supply as well as removal of storm water and wastewater. Virtually all were made from clay or even rock. wwlhcr_ss__87817.jpg When made from terracotta, they were usually in the form of canals and spherical or rectangle-shaped piping. These incorporated cone-like and U-shaped clay conduits which were unique to the Minoans. The water supply at Knossos Palace was handled with a strategy of clay piping which was positioned under the floor, at depths varying from a few centimeters to several meters. These Minoan pipelines were also used for amassing and stocking water, not just distribution. This required the clay conduits to be suitable for holding water without losing it. Underground Water Transportation: Originally this system seems to have been designed not for comfort but to offer water to certain individuals or rituals without it being seen. Quality Water Transportation: Many scholars consider that these pipes were used to develop a different distribution system for the palace.

The First Public Water Fountains

Towns and communities depended on practical water fountains to funnel water for preparing food, washing, and cleaning from local sources like lakes, streams, or creeks. The force of gravity was the power supply of water fountains up until the close of the 19th century, using the forceful power of water traveling downhill from a spring or creek to squeeze the water through spigots or other outlets. Fountains spanning history have been developed as monuments, impressing hometown citizens and travelers alike. The common fountains of modern times bear little likeness to the very first water fountains. A natural stone basin, carved from rock, was the very first fountain, utilized for containing water for drinking and religious purposes. The first stone basins are thought to be from about 2000 B.C.. Early fountains put to use in ancient civilizations relied on gravity to manipulate the circulation of water through the fountain. These original water fountains were built to be functional, frequently situated along reservoirs, creeks and rivers to provide drinking water.

Fountains with elaborate decoration began to show up in Rome in about 6 B.C., normally gods and wildlife, made with stone or copper-base alloy. The people of Rome had an elaborate system of aqueducts that provided the water for the many fountains that were situated throughout the community.

Original Water Delivery Techniques in The City Of Rome

Aqua Anio Vetus, the first raised aqueduct assembled in Rome, started out supplying the men and women living in the hills with water in 273 BC, although they had counted on natural springs up until then. When aqueducts or springs weren’t available, people dwelling at raised elevations turned to water removed from underground or rainwater, which was made possible by wells and cisterns. From the beginning of the sixteenth century, water was routed to Pincian Hill via the subterranean channel of Acqua Vergine. The aqueduct’s channel was made reachable by pozzi, or manholes, that were placed along its length when it was initially constructed. Although they were initially designed to make it possible to support the aqueduct, Cardinal Marcello Crescenzi started out using the manholes to accumulate water from the channel, starting when he obtained the property in 1543. It appears that, the rainwater cistern on his property wasn’t good enough to meet his needs. Thankfully, the aqueduct sat just below his property, and he had a shaft opened to give him access.

The Root of Contemporary Wall Fountains

Hundreds of ancient Greek documents were translated into Latin under the auspices of the scholarly Pope Nicholas V, who ruled the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455. In order to make Rome worthy of being the capital of the Christian world, the Pope resolved to enhance the beauty of the city.

At the bidding of the Pope, the Aqua Vergine, a ruined aqueduct which had carried clean drinking water into Rome from eight miles away, was restored starting in 1453. Building a mostra, an imposing celebratory fountain built by ancient Romans to memorialize the entry point of an aqueduct, was a tradition revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was commissioned by the Pope to construct a wall fountain where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The Trevi Fountain as well as the well-known baroque fountains found in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona were eventually supplied with water from the modified aqueduct he had reconstructed.

Bernini’s Very First Italian Fountains

The Barcaccia, a stunning water fountain constructed at the base of the Trinita dei Monti in Piaza di Spagna, was Bernini's earliest fountain. Roman locals and site seers who appreciate verbal exchanges as well as being the company of others still flood this spot. One of the city’s most stylish meeting spots are the streets surrounding Bernini's fountain, which would certainly have brought a smile to the great Bernini. In around 1630, Pope Urbano VIII helped Bernini start off his career with the construction of his first water fountain. People can now see the fountain as an illustration of a great ship gradually sinking into the Mediterranean Sea. Period writings dating back to the 16th century indicate that the fountain was built as a memorial to those who lost their lives in the great flooding of the Tevere. Absenting himself from Italy only once in his life for a prolonged time period, in 1665 Bernini traveled to France.