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 The Various Construction Materials of Garden Fountains

The Various Construction Materials of Garden Fountains

Though they come in alternative materials, today’s garden fountains tend to be made of metal. Metallic fountains, with their clean lines and sculptural accents, exist in in a range of metals and can accommodate any style or budget. The interior design of your home should set the look and feel of your yard and garden as well.

Presently, copper is quite popular for sculptural garden fountains. ft-190__86467.jpg Copper is common for both inside and outside use and is commonly found in tabletop and cascade fountains, among others. Another advantage of copper fountains is they are versatile and come in a wide range of styles.

Brass water fountains are also popular, though they tend to have a more classic look than copper ones. Even though they are a bit old-fashioned, brass fountains are quite common because they often incorporate interesting artwork.

Probably the most cutting-edge of all metals is stainless steel. A contemporary steel design will quickly boost the value of your garden as well as the feeling of peacefulness. Like all water fountains, you can buy them in just about any size you prefer.

Because it is both lighter and more affordable than metal but has a similar look, fiberglass is quite common for fountains. It is simple to clean and maintain a fiberglass water fountain, yet another reason they are common.

The Impact of the Norman Invasion on Anglo Saxon Gardens

The arrival of the Normans in the second half of the 11th century irreparably transformed The Anglo-Saxon lifestyle. The expertise of the Normans exceeded the Anglo-Saxons' in design and agriculture at the time of the conquest. But before focusing on home-life or having the occasion to think about domestic architecture or decoration, the Normans had to subjugate an entire population. Most often designed upon windy summits, castles were fundamental constructs that permitted their occupants to spend time and space to offensive and defensive schemes, while monasteries were rambling stone buildings frequently added in only the most fecund, broad valleys. Gardening, a quiet occupation, was unfeasible in these fruitless fortifications.

The best example of the early Anglo-Norman style of architecture existent in modern times is Berkeley Castle. The keep is said to date from William the Conqueror's time. A big terrace recommended for walking and as a means to stop attackers from mining below the walls runs about the building. A scenic bowling green, covered in grass and surrounded by battlements clipped out of an ancient yew hedge, creates one of the terraces.

The One Cleaning Solution to NEVER Use On Your Outdoor Water fountains

Adequate care and regular upkeep are important to the longevity of water fountains. It is easy for foreign objects to find their way into open-air fountains, so keeping it clean is important. On top of that, algae can be a concern, because sun hitting the water permits it to form easily. Either sea salt, hydrogen peroxide, or vinegar can be mixed into the water to eliminate this issue. Some people opt for adding bleach into the water, but the problem is that it harms wildlife - so it should be avoided.

A complete cleaning every 3-4 months is ideal for garden fountains. Before you start cleaning, all the water must be taken out. Once it is empty, scrub inside the reservoir with a gentle cleanser. Feel free to use a toothbrush if helpful for any smaller crevasses. Do not leave any soap residue in or on the fountain.

Make sure you get rid of any calcium or plankton by taking the pump apart and cleaning the inside properly. Letting it soak in vinegar for a few hours first will make it alot easier to clean. Neither rain water nor mineral water contain components that will accumulate inside the pump, so use either over tap water if possible.

Finally, be sure to have a quick look at your fountain every day and add water if you notice that the level is too low. Allowing the water to drop below the pump’s intake level, can cause serious damage and even make the pump burn out - an undesired outcome!

Inventors of the First Outside Garden Fountains

Commonly working as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and cultivated scholars, all in one, fountain designers were multi-faceted people from the 16th to the late 18th century. Leonardo da Vinci, a Renaissance artist, was renowned as a inspired master, inventor and scientific virtuoso.

The forces of nature inspired him to explore the properties and movement of water, and due to his fascination, he systematically captured his observations in his now famed notebooks. Innovative water exhibits packed of symbolic meaning and all-natural wonder transformed private villa settings when early Italian water feature designers fused imagination with hydraulic and gardening skill. Known for his virtuosity in archeology, architecture and garden creations, Pirro Ligorio, the humanist, delivered the vision behind the wonders in Tivoli. Masterminding the phenomenal water marbles, water attributes and water antics for the assorted estates in the vicinity of Florence, some other water fountain designers were well versed in humanist topics as well as classical technical texts.

Where did Fountains Originate from?

The dramatic or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, in addition to providing drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Pure functionality was the original role of fountains. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with drinking water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up until the 19th century, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water supply, such as aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Serving as an element of adornment and celebration, fountains also supplied clean, fresh drinking water. Roman fountains often depicted imagery of animals or heroes made of metal or stone masks. To illustrate the gardens of paradise, Muslim and Moorish garden planners of the Middle Ages added fountains to their designs. The fountains found in the Gardens of Versailles were meant to show the power over nature held by King Louis XIV of France. The Popes of the 17th and 18th centuries were glorified with baroque style fountains built to mark the place of entry of Roman aqueducts.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for clean, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely decorative. Amazing water effects and recycled water were made possible by switching the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

Modern-day fountains function mostly as decoration for community spaces, to honor individuals or events, and enhance entertainment and recreational events.