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 Outdoor Water Fountains And Public Health

Outdoor Water Fountains And Public Health

ft_191_detail__80855.jpg The first example of a soda tax in the USA came in February 2014, when it was approved by the city of Berkley, California. The taxation is intended to minimize sugary drink consumption and improve the consumption of healthier beverages, like water from fountains. Research was conducted to find out the status of local drinking water fountains and whether people from other racial or economic backgrounds had reduced availability to them. Facts on the city’s drinking water fountains were developed using a GPS created exclusively for the research. This info was cross-referenced with demographic records on race and income collected from the US Census Community Study database. By cross-referencing the water fountain locations with the demographic facts, they were in a position to identify whether access to functioning fountains was class reliant. The surrounding demographics of each water fountain location was made note of, while also determining whether race or income levels made a difference in the state of repair of each individual fountain. The cleanliness of various fountains was found poor, even if most were operating.

Where did Garden Water Fountains Begin?

The dramatic or ornamental effect of a fountain is just one of the purposes it fulfills, as well as delivering drinking water and adding a decorative touch to your property.

Originally, fountains only served a practical purpose. Cities, towns and villages made use of nearby aqueducts or springs to supply them with potable water as well as water where they could bathe or wash. Up until the nineteenth, fountains had to be more elevated and closer to a water source, including aqueducts and reservoirs, in order to benefit from gravity which fed the fountains. Designers thought of fountains as wonderful additions to a living space, however, the fountains also served to provide clean water and celebrate the artist responsible for building it. Animals or heroes made of bronze or stone masks were often times used by Romans to beautify their fountains. During the Middle Ages, Muslim and Moorish garden designers included fountains in their designs to mimic the gardens of paradise. To show his prominence over nature, French King Louis XIV included fountains in the Garden of Versailles. The Romans of the 17th and 18th centuries manufactured baroque decorative fountains to exalt the Popes who commissioned them as well as to mark the location where the restored Roman aqueducts entered the city.

Since indoor plumbing became the standard of the day for fresh, drinking water, by the end of the 19th century urban fountains were no longer needed for this purpose and they became purely ornamental. Impressive water effects and recycled water were made possible by replacing the power of gravity with mechanical pumps.

These days, fountains adorn public spaces and are used to pay tribute to individuals or events and fill recreational and entertainment needs.

Outdoor Garden Fountain Designers Through History

Multi-talented individuals, fountain designers from the 16th to the late 18th century often worked as architects, sculptors, artists, engineers and highly educated scholars all in one person. Leonardo da Vinci as a inspired master, inventor and scientific expert exemplified this Renaissance creator. The forces of nature guided him to research the qualities and motion of water, and due to his fascination, he carefully captured his ideas in his now renowned notebooks. Early Italian water feature builders transformed private villa configurations into amazing water displays full of emblematic meaning and natural beauty by combining creativity with hydraulic and gardening experience. The brilliance in Tivoli were developed by the humanist Pirro Ligorio, who was celebrated for his skill in archeology, architecture and garden design. For the assorted lands near Florence, other fountain developers were well versed in humanist themes as well as ancient technical texts, masterminding the excellent water marbles, water attributes and water antics.

What Makes Indoor Wall Water Features Right for You

Indoor fountains have been used for many years as valuable elements to create soothing, worry-free surroundings for patients in clinics and wellness programs. Lightly streaming water lulls people into a state of introspection.

In addition, convalescence is thought to go faster when interior water features are used in treatment. Many doctors and mental health therapists consider these are a useful addition in healing a number of ailments.

PTSD patients as well as those suffering from severe insomnia are thought to feel better after listening to the calming, gentle trickle of water.

A sense of safety and well-being is heightened, according to quite a few studies, when you include an wall fountain in your home. The sight and sound of water are crucial to the existence of human beings and planet earth.

The transformative power of water has long been considered as one of two essential elements used in the teachings of feng-shui. Harmonizing our inner environment so that it promotes serenity and peace is one of the main beliefs in feng-shui. It is essential to include a water element someplace in our homes. Installing a fountain in front of your home or near your entrance is ideal.

Any one of a number of options in water walls, such as a wall mounted waterfall, a freestanding feature or a customized fountain, will certainly provide you and your family many positive results. A number of reports claim that a fountain located in a central living area makes people more cheerful, contented, and relaxed than those who do not have a fountain in the house.

The History of Garden Water Fountains

Pope Nicholas V, himself a well educated man, reigned the Roman Catholic Church from 1397 to 1455 during which time he commissioned many translations of old classical Greek documents into Latin. Embellishing Rome and making it the worthy capital of the Christian world was at the center of his ambitions. Beginning in 1453, the ruined ancient Roman aqueduct known as the Aqua Vergine which had brought fresh drinking water into the city from eight miles away, underwent restoration at the bidding of the Pope. Building a mostra, an imposing commemorative fountain built by ancient Romans to memorialize the arrival point of an aqueduct, was a tradition revived by Nicholas V. The architect Leon Battista Alberti was directed by the Pope to construct a wall fountain where we now find the Trevi Fountain. The aqueduct he had reconditioned included modifications and extensions which eventually enabled it to supply water to the Trevi Fountain as well as the renowned baroque fountains in the Piazza del Popolo and the Piazza Navona.